News

Computational Imaging group news

Developing Improved Breast Cancer Imaging Techniques

Breast Cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Felix Lucka from the Computational Imaging group at CWI is part of a European research team that develops novel imaging techniques that will improve early detection and diagnosis in the future.

Making the invisible visible

CT machines are becoming the standard tool for looking inside objects of all kinds in research and industry. The FleX-ray Lab at CWI is making this type of imaging more accessible to math and computer science researchers. It's also drawing interest from the art, history, and the social sciences community.

Making the invisible visible

CT machines are becoming the standard tool for looking inside objects of all kinds in research and industry. The FleX-ray Lab at CWI is making this type of imaging more accessible to math and computer science researchers. It's also drawing interest from the art, history, and the social sciences community.

CWI part of NWA CORTEX consortium

The National Science Agenda has awarded a 5 million euro grant to CORTEX – the Center for Optimal, Real-Time Machine Studies of the Explosive Universe. Self-learning machines will hunt for explosions in the universe and speed up innovations in industry and society.

Joost Batenburg awarded with Dutch Award for ICT research 2018

Joost Batenburg has been awarded with the Dutch Award for ICT research 2018. CWI’s group leader Computational Imaging and professor at Leiden University receives the award for his research in the area of new algorithms for tomography. An amount of 50.000 euro is attached to the award. This amount can be freely spent, in order to reinforce Batenburg’s research.

Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica launches world-class 3D lab

On Thursday 18 May 2017 demissionary state secretary Sander Dekker opened a new research facility that belongs to the top of the world league at Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica. With the new scanner of this lab, it will be made possible for the first time to look inside objects in 3D during the scanning process and to adjust or zoom in while scanning.

The Netherlands’ smallest supercomputer is here

A team of Dutch scientists has built a supercomputer the size of four pizza boxes. The Little Green Machine II has the computing power of 10,000 PCs and will be used by researchers in oceanography, computer science, artificial intelligence, financial modeling and astronomy. CWI researchers Joost Batenburg and Kees Oosterlee, who were part of the development team, will use the machine for computational imaging and machine learning for time series respectively. The computer is based at Leiden University (the Netherlands) and developed with help from IBM.

Faster computation of high-quality 3D images

PhD student Daniël Pelt of CWI has developed new algorithms for computer tomography (CT) for fast computation of high-quality three-dimensional images. This increases the practical use of this technology in areas such as material sciences and biomedical research.

Vici grant for Joost Batenburg

Researcher Joost Batenburg of CWI has been awarded a Vici grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) for his proposal 'Real-Time 3D Tomography'. With the 1.5 million euro grant, Batenburg can develop his own research line in the next five years.