News

Cryptology group news

Cécile Pierrot wins Cercle K2 Cybersecurity Trophy 2017

Cécile Pierrot from the Cryptology research group at CWI won the first Cybersecurity Trophy granted by Cercle K2. This French think tank awards prizes in 22 topics every two years. It aims at stimulating interdisciplinarity and promoting young researchers. The Cybersecurity Trophy 2017 rewarded Pierrot’s PhD thesis, which she defended at UPMC in Paris on 25 November 2016. The jury praised her for both theoretical and practical impacts of her results.

ERC Advanced Grant for CWI cryptographer Ronald Cramer

CWI cryptographer Ronald Cramer has been awarded an ERC Advanced Grant of 2.5 million euro for his proposal 'Algebraic Methods for Stronger Crypto'. He leads the Cryptology Research group at Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam and is a full professor at the Mathematical Institute of Leiden University. The European Research Council awards these most prestigious personal grants to outstanding, well-established scientists with novel ideas towards high-risk, groundbreaking research that impacts both science and society at large.

CWI and Google announce first collision for Industry Security Standard SHA-1

'Industry deprecation proved to be too slow' Today, Thursday 23 February 2017, researchers at the Dutch research institute CWI and Google jointly announce that they have broken the SHA-1 internet security standard in practice. This industry standard is used for digital signatures and file integrity verification, which secure credit card transactions, electronic documents, GIT open-source software repositories and software distribution.

New attacks on location-based quantum cryptography

For secure communication of classified information, researchers want to deploy the sender’s location, so a receiver can be sure that a message is, for instance, really coming from the White House. Classic location-based methods are shown to be unsafe but location-based quantum cryptography seemed to have a chance.

Three articles from the Netherlands published in ERCIM News 106 on Cybersecurity

In July 2016, ERCIM News 106 was published: ercim-news.ercim.eu/en106. This issue featured a special theme on Cybersecurity, in which three articles from the Netherlands were published and one from Belgium. Another article from the Netherlands, on the 100th birthday of former CWI (MC) director and informatics pioneer Aad van Wijngaarden, was published in the Research & Society section.

First book on quantum-secure multi-party computation

Ronald Cramer (Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica), Ivan Damgard and Jesper Nielsen (Aarhus University) recently published the first book ever on information-theoretically secure multiparty computation (MPC) – a subfield of cryptography that describes security systems that cannot even be broken by quantum computers or unlimited computing power.

CWI joins Sino-European research network LIAMA

Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) has officially joined research network LIAMA. The Sino-European Laboratory in Computer Science, Automation and Applied Mathematics (LIAMA) is a research lab consisting of European and Chinese research institutes in the field of mathematics and computer science. LIAMA conducts research, training and transfer projects in these fields. CWI will join the lab as one of the founding members.

Two CWI cryptographers honoured at CRYPTO 2013

During CRYPTO – one of the two leading crypto conferences in the world – two researchers from Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam were honoured: Ronald Cramer and Marc Stevens. The 33rd CRYPTO conference took place in  Santa Barbara, Ca., USA in August 2013.

Future mobile payments safer with quantum cryptographic identification

Payment by mobile phone will be common in the near future. Security of the payment system will partly be based on secure identification, and it will be crucial that no secret-key material, like a PIN or a password, is leaked while interacting with the payment terminal. Niek Bouman of Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam has investigated a new identification method based on quantum mechanics.