News

Scientific Computing group news

Two CWI scientists receive JCF Young Researcher Award

CWI scientists Dr. Anastasia Borovykh and Dr. Beatriz Salvador have received the JCF Young Researcher Award, granted by the Journal of Computational Finance. Both researchers were awarded for their outstanding work, which they presented during the International Conference on Computational Finance.

In Memoriam Piet Hemker

With sadness we announce that CWI Fellow and former CWI researcher Piet Hemker passed away on 27 May. Hemker had been working at CWI from 1970–2006 and since 1989 also as a professor at the UvA. He has been a CWI Fellow since 2001 and was named Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion in 2006.

CWI develops price models for financial derivatives

The risks of trading complicated financial contracts can be unclear to a certain extent. In order to get a better insight in the determination of prices of such financial derivatives, CWI researcher Anton van der Stoep developed and improved financial mathematical research methods.

Instable blood supply may help healthy cells compete with tumor cells

Researchers of CWI’s Scientific Computing group have found that instabilities in the blood supply in cancerous tissue can, surprisingly, lead to a less favorable environment for tumor cells. Their findings shed light on the potential negative side effects of current treatments that aim to actually normalize the blood supply in cancerous tissues.

Better estimation of financial risks possible with maths

Due to the recent financial crisis, the requirements imposed on banks have been made stricter. Banks must model the credit risk of the counterparties now in their portfolios, for instance. A measure for this is the credit value adjustment (CVA): the difference between the value of a portfolio without credit risk and the value if a possible bankruptcy of the counterparty is included. Qian Feng modelled CVAs and designed a new algorithm that can help banks estimate the risks precisely, so they can take appropriate measures if necessary.

The Netherlands’ smallest supercomputer is here

A team of Dutch scientists has built a supercomputer the size of four pizza boxes. The Little Green Machine II has the computing power of 10,000 PCs and will be used by researchers in oceanography, computer science, artificial intelligence, financial modeling and astronomy. CWI researchers Joost Batenburg and Kees Oosterlee, who were part of the development team, will use the machine for computational imaging and machine learning for time series respectively. The computer is based at Leiden University (the Netherlands) and developed with help from IBM.

Dealing with uncertainties in simulations

Understanding uncertainties is crucial when designing computer simulations. Incorporating such uncertainties in simulations and mapping the bandwith of possbile values  is the central topic of the inaugural lecture of Daan Crommelin at the University of Amsterdam on Thursday 21 April 2016.

CWI reduces perturbations in tomography

Researcher Folkert Bleichrodt of CWI has developed new methods to improve the applicability of tomography. These methods reduce unwanted perturbations. This allows for applying tomography on a very small scale or based on a small number of measurements.

More accurate climate predictions

Predicting the future climate is a grand mathematical challenge. Our climate is a chaotic dynamical system in which minor disturbances can have a major impact in the longterm. Researcher Keith Myerscough of CWI has developed new simulation methods to improve the accuracy of such long term predictions.

Rare events in sustainable energy grids simulated

The transition to renewable energy sources poses new challenges to the reliability of power grids. As renewable energy is very variable, rare combinations of factors might lead to instabilities and even black-outs. Wander Wadman of Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) developed new simulation methods that can determine the probability of such rare events.

Simulations for nuclear fusion

The plasma inside a nuclear fusion reactor is prone to instabilities due to the extreme temperatures and high magnetic fields necessary for nuclear fusion. The future of nuclear fusion as an energy source depends on a large extent on methods to control these instabilities.

European consortium starts research on financial risk models

A European consortium of partners in academia and industry from the Netherlands, Italy and Spain has been granted 1,5 million euro for the Horizon 2020 research project WAKEUPCALL. The project, which  is coordinated by the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam, combines academic expertise in financial mathematics with experience from partners in the finance and insurance industries.

CWI joins two large-scale energy projects

Researchers of CWI will participate in the projects ‘Smart Energy Systems in the Built Environment’ and ‘Excellence in Uncertainty Reduction of Offshore Wind Systems (EUROS)’ of the STW Perspective research programmes that were recently awarded.

Stieltjes Prize 2013 for Benjamin Sanderse

Benjamin Sanderse, former PhD Student of CWI, has been awarded the Stieltjes Prize 2013, the prize for the best PhD thesis in mathematics in the Netherlands in 2013. In March 2013 Sanderse defended his thesis 'Energy-conserving discretization methods for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations' at Eindhoven University of Technology under the supervision of Prof. dr. ir. Barry Koren.

NAW publication on Mathematics and Planet Earth

Daan Crommelin (CWI) and Henk Schuttelaars (TU Delft) were guest editors of a special issue of Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde (NAW) on Mathematics and Planet Earth that was recently published. Daan Crommelin also wrote a blog post for the Daily Blog of the 'Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013' (MPE) website on this special publication. A summary follows below.