News

Life Sciences group news

Comparing medical images better

Together with the radiation oncology department of AMC, Peter Bosman of CWI’s Life Sciences and Health group has been awarded 1.4 million euros for a project in NWO’s Open Technology Programme for the research and development of a new medical image registration method. This project is co-funded by companies Elekta and Xomnia.

A puzzle with a million pieces: assembling viral genomes from sequencing data

Researchers from CWI’s Life Science and Health group have developed a new computational tool, SAVAGE, for reconstructing the genomes of the different virus strains that affect an infected person. SAVAGE makes it possible to reconstruct the different strains – of which there can be plenty in an infected person – even when so called reference genomes are not available

Cells’ own contractions stimulate growth orientation

During the growth of embryos cells align with forces from the surrounding tissue. These forces originate from differences in growth rates, muscle contractions or gravity. Mathematicians at the CWI research centre in Amsterdam now showed for the first time that active cell contractions can accelerate and facilitate this reorientation of cells. Their research was recently published in the leading Biophysical Journal (112).

Shape instructs future fate of cells in Nature Communications

How does a cell make a decision about his future, on what type of cell it will be after the cell division? This process is described by Roeland Merks and Cong Chen of the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam in an article in Nature Communications that was published on 28 June, together with a Japanese team of biologists.

CWI develops new techniques for studying vascular growth

Blood vessels are essential for efficient transport of oxygen and nutrients throughout the body, and play a crucial role in tumor growth and wound healing. Sonja Boas, PhD student in CWI's Life Sciences group, developed new techniques to study vascular growth computationally.

CWI to improve ICT for radiotherapy

CWI launches a research project with the Academic Medical Center (AMC) and the company Elekta Brachytherapy to improve the ICT that is used in radiotherapy for cancer patients. In the next years, researchers of these organizations will investigate the improvement of medical software and instruments that are used for internal radiation.

AMC, KiKa and CWI join forces in new research project

The Foundation Children Cancer free (Stichting Kinderen Kankervrij), the Department of Radiation Oncology of the Academic Medical Center (AMC) and the research group Life Sciences of Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) join forces in a new research project to survey radiation-related long-term effects  more accurately than ever before.

Computer simulations show mechanisms behind vascular development

The vascular system continuously forms new capillaries throughout the life of an organism. This is necessary for growth and healing. The same process is also involved in various pathological processes, such as tumour growth and eye diseases. Computational biologist Margriet Palm of CWI used simulated experiments to investigate vascular development.

Nature Genetics article: Genome of the Netherlands developed

In a large-scale research project under supervision of University Medical Center Groningen (UMCG) researchers have developed a genetic profile of the Netherlands. The researchers have mapped the DNA sequences of 250 family trios, consisting of two parents and one child, across the Netherlands.

CWI researchers in European RETHINK big project

Every two days, we create the equivalent of all the data generated throughout human history up until 2003. The intelligent use of this data shows enormous potential for generating new knowledge and other related benefits for  business, science and society.

Brain mechanisms better understood with new model

Building a neural network with the same properties and capacity as the human brain is the holy grail in neuroinformatics. Such a network would not only explain the inner workings of the brain, but would also pave the road for brain-controlled machines such as computers operated by thought and robot limbs for the handicapped.

CWI simulates brain activity on video cards

Neuroinformaticists of Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam managed to simulate complex brain activity on simple video cards. The simulated brain contains 50,000 neurons communicating with 35 million signals per second. This is comparable to the brain capacity of insects such as ants or flies.

New computer techniques speed up drug research

A computer algorithm developed by bioinformaticists at Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam speeds up simulations predicting the effect of drugs on the human body. This allows pharmaceutical researchers to discover new drugs more quickly.