EQuA: Early Quality Assurance in Software Production

The production of software is, even after 50 years of experience, still not without its problems. Recent examples in Dutch society (in the context of the tax and the social security agency) have had far-reaching societal and financial consequences. It is well known that the detection of defects early in the software lifecycle pays off. It lowers cost and improves quality [1].

The production of software is, even after 50 years of experience, still not without its problems. Recent examples in Dutch society (in the context of the tax and the social security agency) have had far-reaching societal and financial consequences. It is well known that the detection of defects early in the software lifecycle pays off. It lowers cost and improves quality [1]. Software engineering researchers have developed a host of methods and techniques, but many of these results have not been transferred to industry. This is caused by a a lack of knowledge, a lack of money or a (perceived) lack of time. Companies are often driven by the pressure to deliver new features. As a result they are not able or willing to translate validated results from software engineering research into the daily practice of software development. Within the EQuA project this translation of research results is the primary focus. This requires categorizing both the current state-of-the-practice and state-of-the-art and determining what is most effective in practical software development. The research will evaluated in the context of game development.

[1] B.W. Boehm, Software Engineering Economics, Prentice Hall, 1981.

Members

  • Prof. Dr. Paul Klint (project leader)

Partners